Newspapers:  "The Herald of Freedom, and the Federal  Advertiser.", 1789, New York, NY


        Newspapers:  "The Herald of Freedom, and the Federal  Advertiser."; 
        New York, Tuesday, October 20, 1789.
        
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                    T h e   H e r a l d   o f   F r e e d o m,
        
                                   a n d   t h e
        
                       F E D E R A L   A D V E R T I S E R.
        
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        [Price Three Cents]     TUESDAY, October 20, 1789    [12s per ann.]
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        
                             SIXTEENTH ACT of CONGRESS
                                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        
                          CONGRESS of the UNITED STATES.
        
                Begun and held at the city of Newyork on Wednesday
                            the 4th day of March, 1789.
        
        An ACT to explain and amend, an Act entitled, "An ACT for register-
        ing  and clearing Vessels, regulating the Coasting Trade,  and  for 
        other purposes."
        
        Sec.  1.  Be it enacted by the Senate and House of  Representatives 
        of  the United States of America in Congress assembled,  That  when 
        any  goods, wares or merchandize of foreign growth or  manufacture, 
        shall  be  unladen from any ship or vessel in virtue  of  a  permit 
        obtained for that purpose, and shall be put into a craft or vessel, 
        with  intent  to be transported to a landing within the  said  dis-
        trict,  it  shall be the duty of the Inspector,  or  other  officer 
        attending  the  unlading of such goods, wares  or  merchandize,  to 
        deliver to the master or commander of every such craft or vessel, a
        certificate  of such goods, wares and merchandize having been  duly 
        entered, and a permit granted therefor; and such certificate  shall 
        contain  a  description of all the packages, with their  marks  and 
        numbers  and shall authorize the transportation and landing  within 
        the  same district, without any further fee or permit, anything  in 
        the said recited Act to the contrary not withstanding.
        
        Sec.  2.   And be it further enacted, That so much of  the  twenty-
        second section of the said recited Act, as exempts vessels of  less 
        than  twenty, and not less than five tons burden, employed  between 
        any of the district of the United States, in any bay or river,  and 
        having  a license from the Collector of the district to which  such 
        vessel  belongs,  from entering and clearing for the  term  of  one 
        year,  be extended to vessels not exceeding fifty  tons:   Provided 
        such  vessel shall not have on board goods, wares  and  merchandize 
        other than such as are actually the growth or produce of the United 
        States.
        
        Sec.  3.  And be it further enacted, That so much of an Act,  enti-
        tled,  "An Act to regulate the collection of the duties imposed  by 
        law  on  the tonnage of ships or vessels and on  goods,  wares  and 
        merchandizes  imported in to the United States." as hath rated  the 
        ruble  of Russia at one hundred cents, be, and the same  is  hereby 
        repealed and made null and void.
        
                            Frederick A. Muhlenberg, Speaker of the
                                 House of Representatives.
                            John Adams, Vice-President of the United States
                                 and President of the Senate.
             Approved, September 20th, 1789.
        
                                GEORGE WASHINGTON,
                                    President of the United States.
        
                               ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        
        
                            SEVENTEENTH ACT of CONGRESS
                                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        
                      An ACT providing for the Payment of the
                   Invalid  Pensioners  of  the  United States.
        
        Be  it  enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives  of  the 
        United  States of America in Congress assembled, That the  Military 
        Pensions which have been granted and paid by the States respective-
        ly,  in  pursuance  of the acts of the United  States  in  Congress 
        assembled, to the Invalids who were wounded and disabled during the 
        war,  shall  be continued and paid by the United States,  from  the 
        fourth  day  of March last, for the space of one year,  under  such 
        regulations as the President of the United States may direct.
        
                            Frederick A. Muhlenberg, Speaker of the
                                 House of Representatives.
                            John Adams, Vice-President of the United States
                                 and President of the Senate.
             Approved, September 29th, 1789.
        
                                GEORGE WASHINGTON,
                                    President of the United States.
        
                               ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                                         New - York, October 10, 1789.    
        TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Sept. 19, 1786.
        
                          The SECRETARY of the TREASURY,
        
             In obedience to the Order of the House of Representatives,  of 
        the 17th inst.
        
             Respectfully Reports,
        
             That  the  schedule No. 1 contains an estimate  of  the  total 
        expenditure  of the Civil List, for the present year, amounting  to 
        two  hundred and forty three thousand and three hundred and  thirty 
        three dollars and seventy-eight cents.
        
             That  the  schedule No. 2 contains an estimate  of  the  total 
        expenditure  for  the  Department of War,  for  the  present  year, 
        amounting  to one hundred, sixty three thousand and  seventy  eight 
        dollars, and sixty-six cents.
        
             That  the  schedule 3. contains a statement of the  amount  of 
        Warrants issued by the late Board of Treasury, which remain  unsat-
        isfied,  being  189,906  dollars, and 38 cents,  which  amount,  as 
        appears by the same schedule, comprises the sum of 34,657  dollars, 
        and 67 cents, included in the estimate for the civil list, and  the 
        sum of 25, 575 dollars, 34 cents, included in the estimate for  the 
        Department  of  War,  leaving a balance of two  hundred  and  eight 
        thousand six hundred and seventy six dollars, and eleven cents,  on 
        the civil list, and three dollars, and 32 cents, on the  Department 
        of War:  for which appropriations are requisite, besides the amount 
        of warrants.
        
             The  Secretary begs leave to remark, that he has inserted,  in 
        the civil list, the compensations allowed by the late government to 
        the  Paymaster General and Commissioner of Army Accounts,  and  his 
        Clerks,  for the entire year, on the following grounds -  The  duty 
        assigned to the Commissioners of Army Accounts, by an ordinance  of 
        Congress  of  th 7th of May 1787, is to receive from  the  District 
        Commissioners,  constituted thereby, the accounts and  vouchers  of 
        the several States, for certain payments and advances on account of 
        the  Army and Militia, in the service of the United States,  during 
        the  late war; and to examine those accounts; passing such  as  are 
        authorised  by  the  resolutions of Congress, and  stating  to  the 
        General  Board  of  Commissioners such as do not  fall  under  that 
        description,  with remarks tending to elucidate the nature  of  the 
        claims  they  exhibit,  to be decided by that  board  on  equitable 
        principles.
        
             Hence the office of Commissioner of Army Accounts forms a part 
        of  the system of that ordinance which appears to have been  recog-
        nized  as  continuing  in force by the act  for  settling  accounts 
        between the United States and individual States.  The  Commissioner 
        in question reports, that the accounts of Newhampshire, Connecticut 
        and  Newyork,  have been examined, stated, and are  ready  for  the 
        General  Board:  that those of Massachusetts and Rhodeisland,  will 
        probably  be finished in the course of a month; and that  those  of 
        Newjersey are now also under examination.
        
             The  Secretary begs leave further to remark, that  the  annual 
        amount of Pensions to Invalids which has been usually  comprehended 
        in  the Civil List, is estimated at ninety-six thousand and  seven-
        teen  dollars, and eleven cents, as pr. schedule No. 4, but  it  is 
        understood,  that  a considerable part of these pensions,  for  the 
        present year, has been paid by the respective States - though it is 
        not known to what extent.
        
             That  there  still  remain unsatisfied  warrants,  which  were 
        issued  by  the late Superintendent of Finance, to  the  amount  of 
        ninety-three thousand, four hundred and sixty-three dollars, and 26 
        cents, the chief part of which were granted for supplies  furnished 
        to the American prisoners during the war.
        
                          All which is humbly submitted.
                                   ALEXANDER HAMILTON,
                                       Secretary of the Treasury.
        
                               ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        
                            ESTIMATE of the EXPENDITURE
                 for the CIVIL LIST of the United States, for the
                                    year 1789.
                      First, In relation to the  Government.
                                   For CONGRESS.
        
             The  annual  allowance  made  by  the  United 
        States, in Congress assembled, the 23d Aug.  1787, 
        including  the salaries of the  private  Secretary 
        and Steward, house rent and expense of  household, 
        is  thereby fixed at 8,000 dollars pr. ann.  which 
        being estimated to the 3d of March, the time fixed 
        for  the  proceedings to commence  under  the  New 
        Constitution, is                                       1,358  81
             The  salaries to the following  officers  are 
        computed  from  1st of January, to  the  times  to 
        which  the  Board of Treasury  have  issued  their 
        warrant  for  payment, under a  presumption,  that 
        they were entitled to salary until the delivery of 
        the books, papers, and records of the late  Secre-
        tary's  Office  of Congress, to the  Secretary  of 
        State; The Secretary of Congress from 1st  January 
        to the 30th of June, at the rate of 2,600  dollars 
        pr.ann.                                   1,300
        Deputy Secretary, same times, at 800        400
        One Clerk to do, do 450                     225
        One Clerk to the 7th of May, at 450         158 10
        Door keeper to the 31st of March, at 400    100
        Do. for  taking care of Office for 
        nine months last past,                       40
                                                  --------
                                                  2,223 10
        Carried forward                                        3,582 91
        
                        For the Department of the Treasury.
             COMPUTED from the 1st of January, to the 11th 
        of Sept. being the day on which the commission  of 
        the  Secretary  of the Treasury is dated,  and  to 
        which time the services of the respective officers 
        were  actually continued.  Three Commissioners  of 
        the  Board  of  Treasury,  each  at  the  rate  of 
        2,250 
        dollars pr. annum,                                     4,706 22
        Their Secretary, at the rate of 1,300 do.              1,045 75
          Three Clerks, do.               450 do.                941 23
          Messenger and Housekeeper,      150 do.                104 53
          Acomptant of the Treasury,      800 do.                557 70
          Two Clerks, at the rate of      450 do.                627 45
          Register of the Treasury      1,000 do.                836 60
          One Clerk on the books of 
        the publick creditor, called
        debt funded at the Treasury
        transfers, &c. &c.                450 do.                313 68
          One do. on the principal
        books of the Treasury, in jour-
        nalizing and posting,                 do.                313 68
          One do. in copying fair
        statements of the publick ac-
        counts and other transcripts, is
        required from the Treasury
        book                                  do.                313 68
          Two do. on the old accounts
        of the Treasury and books and
        accounts of the late State
        Commissioners,                        do.                627 45
          Treasurer of the United
        States, at the rate of          1,250 do.                871 47
          One Clerk at the rate of        450 do.                313 68
          Commissioner for adjusting
        the accounts of the late secret
        and commercial committees of 
        Congress, including Clerks wages,
        Office rent, and other contingen-
        cies from 1st of January to the
        30th of June, to which day war-
        rants were issued by the late
        Board of Treasury on the presum-
        ption before mentioned, at a 
        rate of 1,900 dollars pr. annum,                         950 00
          This Commissioner, in virtue
        of his appointment by the late
        Board of Treasury, is in pub-
        lication of all the books and
        papers of those two Committees,
        and it is supposed will claim a
        compensation until the Commis-
        sioner of the board expired.
          Commissioner for adjusting the
        accounts in the Commissionary and 
        Quarter-Master's Departments, from
        the 1st of January to the 8th of May,
        1789, when the commission expired, 
        at the rate of 1,250 dollars pr. annum,                  444 50
          Eight Clerks, at the rate of 1,250
        dollars pr. annum,                                     1,279 66
          Commissioner for adjusting the ac-
        counts in the Marine, Clothing and 
        Hospital Departments, from the 1st of
        January to the 8th of May, when this
        commission also expired, at the rate of
        1,250 dollars, pr. annum,                                444 50
          Four Clerks, at the rate of 450 dol-
        lars, pr. annum,                                         637 54
          One do. from the 1st of January to
        the 31st of March (the time of his de-
        cease) at the rate of 450 dollars pr. ann.               112 45
                                                               --------
                                                              15,141 77
                                 (To be continued)
                               ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        
                            EIGHTEENTH ACT of CONGRESS
                                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        
                          CONGRESS of the UNITED STATES.
        
                Begun and held at the city of Newyork on Wednesday
                            the 4th day of March 1789.
        
             An ACT for allowing COMPENSATION to the Members of the  Senate 
        and  House  of  Representatives of the United States,  and  to  the 
        Officers of both Houses.
        
        Be  it  enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives  of  the 
        United  States  of  America in Congress assembled,  That  at  every 
        session  of  Congress, and at every meeting of the  Senate  in  the 
        recess  of Congress, prior to the fourth day of March, in the  year 
        one thousand, seven hundred and ninety-five, each Senator shall  be 
        entitled  to receive six dollars for every day he shall attend  the 
        Senate,  and shall also be allowed at the commencement and  end  of 
        every such session and meeting, six dollars for every twenty  miles 
        of  the estimated distance, by the most usual road, from his  place 
        of  residence to the seat of Congress;  And in case any  member  of 
        the Senate shall be detained by sickness on his journey to or  from 
        any  such session or meeting, or after his arrival shall be  unable
        to attend the Senate, he shall be entitled to the same daily allow-
        ance:   Provided  always, That no Senator shall be  allowed  a  sum 
        exceeding  the rate of six dollars a day, from the end of one  such 
        session or meeting to the time of his taking a seat in another.

             And be it further enacted, That at every session of  Congress, 
        and at every meeting of the Senate in the recess of Congress, after 
        the aforesaid fourth day of March, in the year one thousand,  seven 
        hundred and ninety-five, each Senator shall be entitled to  receive 
        seven  dollars for every day he shall attend the Senate, and  shall 
        also  be allowed at the commencement and end of every such  session 
        and meeting, seven dollars for every twenty miles of the  estimated 
        distance,  by the most usual road, from his place of  residence  to 
        the  seat of Congress:  And in case any member of the Senate  shall 
        be detained by sickness, on his journey to or from any such session 
        or  meeting,  or after his arrival shall be unable  to  attend  the 
        Senate, he shall be entitled to the same allowance of seven dollars 
        a  day  - Provided always, That no Senator shall be allowed  a  sum 
        exceeding  the  rate of seven dollars a day, from the end  of  such 
        session or meeting to the time of his taking a seat in another.
        
             And be it further enacted, That at every session of  Congress, 
        each  Representative shall be entitled to receive six  dollars  for 
        every  day he shall attend the House of Representatives; and  shall 
        also  be allowed at the commencement and end of every session,  six 
        dollars  for every twenty miles of the estimated distance,  by  the 
        most  usual road, from his place of residence to the seat  of  Con-
        gress:   And in case any Representative shall be detained by  sick-
        ness,  on his journey to or from the session of Congress, or  after 
        his arrival shall be unable to attend the House of Representatives, 
        he  shall  be entitled to the daily allowance  aforsaid:   And  the 
        Speaker  of the House of Representatives, to defray the  incidental 
        expenses of his office, shall be entitled to receive in addition to 
        his compensation as a Representative, six dollars for every day  he 
        shall  attend the House:  Provided always, That  no  Representative 
        shall  be  allowed a sum exceeding the rate of six dollars  a  day, 
        from  the  end of one such session or meeting to the  time  of  his 
        taking a seat in another.
        
             And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed to each 
        chaplain  of Congress, at the rate of 500 dollars per annum  during 
        the  session of Congress, to the secretary of the Senate and  clerk 
        of the House of Representatives, fifteen hundred dollars per  annum 
        each,  to commence from the time of their respective  appointments; 
        and also a further allowance of two dollars per day to each, during 
        the  session of that branch for which he officiates:  And the  said 
        secretary  and clerk shall each be allowed (when the  President  of 
        the  Senate  and  Speaker shall deem it necessary)  to  employ  one 
        principal  clerk, who shall be paid three dollars per day,  and  an 
        engrossing clerk, who shall be paid two dollars per day during  the 
        session, with the like compensation to such clerk while he shall be 
        necessarily employed in the recess.
        
             And  be  it further enacted, That the  following  compensation 
        shall  be allowed to the officers herein after mentioned,  viz.  To
        the serjeant at arms, during the session and while employed on  the 
        business of the House, four dollars per day:  the allowance of  the 
        present serjeant at arms to commence from the time of his  appoint-
        ment  : To the door-keeper of the Senate and House  of  Representa-
        tives,  for their services in those offices, three dollars per  day 
        during the session of the House to which he may belong, for his own 
        services, and for the hire of necessary Labourers; the allowance to 
        the  present  door-keeper of the Senate to commence  from  the  day 
        appointed  for  the meeting of Congress; and the allowance  to  the 
        door-keeper  of the House of Representatives to commence  from  his 
        appointment: ; and to the assistant door-keeper to each House,  two 
        dollars per day during the sessions.
        
             And be further enacted, That the said compensation which shall 
        be  due to the members and officers of the Senate, shall be  certi-
        fied  by the President; and that which shall be due to the  members 
        and officers of the House of Representatives, shall be certified by 
        the  Speaker; and the same shall be passed as public accounts,  and 
        paid out of the public treasury.
        
             And  be  it further enacted, That this act shall  continue  in 
        force until the fourth day of March, in the year one thousand seven 
        hundred and ninety-six, and no longer.
        
                            Frederick A. Muhlenberg, Speaker of the
                                 House of Representatives.
                            John Adams, Vice-President of the United States
                                 and President of the Senate.
             Approved, September 22th, 1789.
        
                                GEORGE WASHINGTON,
                                    President of the United States.
        
                               ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        
        
                            NINETEENTH ACT of CONGRESS
                                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        
                     An ACT for the temporary establishment of
                                 the POST OFFICE.
        
             Be  it enacted by the Senate and House of  Representatives  of 
        the  United  States of America in Congress  assembled,  That  there 
        shall be appointed a Post-Master General; his powers and salary and 
        the  compensation to the assistant or clerk and deputies  which  he 
        may  appoint, and the regulations of the Post-Office shall  be  the 
        same as they last were under the resolutions and ordinances of  the 
        late Congress.  The Post-Master General to be subject to the direc-
        tion of the President of the United States in performing the duties 
        of  his office, and in forming contracts for the transportation  of 
        the mail.
        
             Be  it further enacted, That this act shall continue in  force 
        until the end of the next session of Congress, and no longer.

                            Frederick A. Muhlenberg, Speaker of the
                                 House of Representatives.
                            John Adams, Vice-President of the United States
                                 and President of the Senate.
             Approved, September 22th, 1789.
        
                                GEORGE WASHINGTON,
                                    President of the United States.
        
                               ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        
                            Frederick A. Muhlenberg, Speaker of the
                                 House of Representatives.
                            John Adams, Vice-President of the United States
                                 and President of the Senate.
             Approved, September 22th, 1789.
        
                                GEORGE WASHINGTON,
                                    President of the United States.
        
                               ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        
                                 F  R  A  N  C  E.
                                  Paris, Aug. 17.
                    D E C L A R A T I O N   O F   R I G H T S.
        
             M.  de  Mirabeau, Member of the Committee of  Five,  made  the 
        report of the Committee on the Declaration of Rights; and having in 
        a  short  speech shewn the difficulty of such  a  Declaration,  for 
        government  that has hither to been vicious, and to employ  such  a 
        Declaration as a preliminary of the constitution of a people, whose 
        constituent  principles  are  unascertained, he  read  the  report, 
        consisting  of eighteen articles, which comprehended the great  and 
        immutable truths that ought to be the basis of all governments.
        
        Substance  of the Declaration of Rights by the Committee  of  Five, 
        appointed to reduce all the other schemes into one.
        
             The  Representatives  of the French Nation,  considering  that 
        ignorance, forgetfulness, or neglect of the Rights of Men, are  the 
        cause  of all the evils which afflict societies, have  resolved  to 
        establish, by a solemn declaration, those important Rights - to the 
        end that those in power may know the degree of authority which they 
        have the right to exercise over the people, and that the people may 
        know the duties to which they ought to submit.
        
             Primo,  All men are born equal and free; and on one person has 
        more rights than another in the exercise of his faculties.
             2.  All political bodies receive their existence from a social 
        contract, and every individual gives to the common stock his person 
        and abilities, to maintain  the general prosperity.
             3.   All the power to which a people submit, proceed  directly 
        from  themselves, and all political associations have the right  to 
        change  their  laws,  when the change shall appear to  them  to  be
        necessary.
             4.   The  common good of all is the principle and the  end  of 
        political association.
             5.   Law  being the expression of the general will,  ought  to 
        ascertain to every man his liberty.
             6.  This liberty consists in being subject to nothing but  the 
        laws.
             7.  The citizen, being free in his person, cannot be seized on 
        but to be carried before the tribunals, formed by law, to be  tried 
        publickly, and to be punished according to the penalties prescribed 
        by law, which penalties ought to be uniform for all citizens.
             8.   Free  in his thoughts, he has the right  to  publish  his 
        thoughts by word or writing, provided that he does not infringe the 
        rights of another.
             9.   He may pass from province to province, or he may go  into 
        foreign parts, unless in cases provided by law.
             10.  All citizens have the right to assemble, when they  think 
        fit, to deliberate on the interest of the society.
             11.   Every man has a right to employ himself in that  species 
        of industry, which his talents or inclination suggests to him.
             12.  No man can be forced to part with his property unless  it 
        is  for  the  public advantage, and until he  shall  have  received 
        adequate compensation for the sacrifice.
             13.  All citizens ought to contribute to the public expense in 
        proportion to their ability.
             14.   No man can be made subject to contributions for  immoral 
        purposes.
             15.   The  collection  of the public revenues  shall  be  made 
        subject to regular rules, and the collectors and officers entrusted 
        with the public treasure shall be made accountable.
             16.   The public expense ought to be carefully regulated,  and 
        no reward ought to be given to any person whatever, unless he shall 
        have deserved it. 
             17.   Civil equality consists not in the equality of  fortune, 
        but  in  the  eligibility of every man to all the  offices  of  the 
        state.
             18.   The establishment of the army, the number of the  troops 
        of which it shall consist, and its expenses ought to depend on  the 
        legislature;  and they cannon be put in motion without the  consent 
        of the civil power.
        
                                * * * * * * * * * *
        
                               E  N  G  L  A  N  D.
                                 London, Aug. 24.
        
             Advixes were received in town this morning by way of Dantzick, 
        that there has been a most bloody engagement in Finland between the 
        Russians and the Swedish armies on the 31st ult. the King of Sweden 
        commanding  his own troops in person.  There are no other  particu-
        lars.
             The Swedes in Finland are mentioned as being in great distress 
        for  provisions  and  even ammunition, occasioned by  some  of  the 
        shoreships sent from Stockholm having fallen into the hands of  the 
        Russian men of war.  The Swedes are now desperate in that Quarter.

             The  cruelties  practiced in the country seats of  the  French 
        Nobility are horrible, and almost past belief - they are too shock-
        ing to be recounted.

             A few days since, a mob, at a place called Argentan,  attacked 
        the  castle  of the Marquiss de Falconnet, the lord of  the  place.  
        They  seized him and were burning him alive, when the  executioners 
        began to quarrel among themselves, which saved his life though  not 
        until  his two feet and one of his hands were burnt off.   The  mob 
        made  him sign a deed, renouncing his estate and title,  observing, 
        that as the King had arranged himself among the Commons, they would 
        no longer have Lords in France.
             The fate of the unfortunate Baron de Bezenval appears  decided 
        :  though  the Committee on this examination has  made  no  report, 
        orders  have been given to have him most narrowly watched for  fear 
        of  an  escape, and three Burgher officer sleep in his  room  every 
        night.
                                * * * * * * * * * *
        
                      B O S T O N, Tuesday, October 20, 1789
                                    ~~~~~~~~~~
        
             Yesterday  the  Hon. MOSES GILL, Esq, had on a  full  suit  of 
        green broad Cloth, manufactured at Princeton, under his  particular 
        inspection and direction, an is nearly equal to any manufactured in 
        Europe.   Thus,  we  see the friends and patrons  of  our  country, 
        promoting and encouraging the great object of national wealth, (the 
        manufacturers of our county) which must eventually make us an happy 
        and flourishing people.
        
                                * * * * * * * * * *
        
                          The ORATORIO of JONAH compleat, 
        
             The solos by Mess'rs. Rea, Fay Brewer, and Dr. Rogerson.   The 
        choruses  by  the Independent Musical  Society.   The  instrumental 
        parts  by a Society of Gentlemen, with the BAND of His Most  Chris-
        tian Majesty's Fleet.
        
             As  the above ORATORIO has been highly applauded by  the  best 
        judges,  and has never been performed in America: and is the  first 
        Performers of this country, will be joined by the excellent Band of 
        His  Most Christian Majesty's squadron; the Public will have  every 
        reason  to expect a more finished and delightful  Performance  than 
        ever was exhibited in the United States.
        
                    The Music to begin at half past 2 o'clock.
        
             TICKETS  at half a dollar each, may be had at  Dr.  Winship's, 
        Union-Street - at B. Guild's Bookstore, and at the Post-Office,  in 
        Cornhill,  -  and  at J. Templeman's, W. Burley's  and  B  Russel's 
        Offices, in State-Street, October 14, 1789.
        
                              * * * * * * * * * * * *






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