Duct Tape Security

also

 

 

In response to the threat of a more intensified war on Iraq

 

 

 

1.

Newsday.com - Duct Tape Leaves a Sticky Security Question 
Duct Tape Leaves a Sticky Security Question ...

Duct Tape Leaves a Sticky Security Question
http://www.newsday.com/news/columnists/ny-vpcoc133128992feb13,0,833575.column?coll=ny-news-columnists

February 13, 2003

It doesn't seem likely the duct tape will do it.

Osama bin Laden is back, announcing solidarity with the Iraqi people and issuing a call to arms. He has previously claimed allegiance with the Palestinians, the Chechens and all others who concur in his fundamentalist fanaticism. Notwithstanding bin Laden's stated contempt for Saddam Hussein's "pagan" regime, the Bush administration immediately claimed the new tape proves bin Laden is in "partnership" with Iraq.

Forgotten - no, ignored - in the administration's new role as huckster for the bin Laden tapes was the top terrorist's how-to guide for surviving assault by the world's mightiest military. "The most effective means to devoid the aerial force of its content is by digging large numbers of trenches and camouflaging them," he advised. If bin Laden wore a T-shirt, it would boast, "I survived your smart bombs."

Americans, especially those in New York and Washington, are told to stock up on duct tape and plastic sheeting as tools for surviving a chemical or biological attack. We also are told not to panic.

The CIA and foreign intelligence agencies have said the possibility of an attack is greater if we go to war against Iraq. As Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.) put it at a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing Tuesday, "Clearly, once invasion begins, Saddam will have nothing to lose."

The CIA and FBI directors have spent much of the week telling Congress that al-Qaida is the gravest and most immediate danger to the nation. "The al-Qaida terrorist network is clearly the most urgent threat to U.S. interests," FBI director Robert Mueller testified. CIA director George Tenet concurred, saying extremists thrive everywhere. They take root especially in "veritable no man's lands" such as the Afghan-Pakistani border.

Now that the White House believes the better war is to be had in Iraq, it is impolite to mention Afghanistan. But Tenet did.

Things do not go well there. U.S. forces toppled the Taliban but did not tear up its roots. It reemerges now, in league with al-Qaida and regional extremists, as a threat. News organizations have reported that a spring offensive against American troops is reportedly planned to coincide with a U.S. assault on Iraq.

International aid groups, the angels who put human need ahead of politics, are planning to evacuate Afghanistan in the event of an Iraqi war. They expect rebel violence against them to increase. Pulling out would fulfill the prophecy of those who said from the start that Americans and others would come with bombs and care packages, but leave before lasting progress could be made.

With the unfinished business in Afghanistan and the government's top security officials warning daily of a catastrophic al-Qaida attack, the administration promises more of the same: war on Iraq and uncertainty at home.

It's been stingy on funding such basic security measures as the proper equipment for firefighters. The Ashcroft Justice Department works hard on more rollbacks of civil liberties as an answer to the fear that the immigrant next door is a terrorist. The roundup of hundreds of immigrants after Sept. 11, 2001, yielded not one indictment charging that any was involved in the attack.

"It tells me that they arrested the wrong guys," said Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-Manhattan).

Nonetheless, those entrusted with American justice want congressional approval for more secret detentions, greater power to strip citizenship from Americans and unchecked authority to deport legal immigrants if the attorney general has "reason to believe" there is a danger. "J. Edgar Ashcroft," Nadler calls the attorney general.

Nadler is the congressman from Ground Zero; his district encompasses the hole that was the World Trade Center. He knows firsthand the level of danger. He does not mind the call for plastic and duct tape, but objects to the rollback of hundreds of years of Western jurisprudence. He can't see that it's been effective so far.

It is, in fact, hard to square claims of progress in the war on terror with the official call for Americans to run to the hardware store and prepare to hunker down. The point of national and domestic security policy is to make us more secure. We wait, still, for our current policies to do that.

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2.

Homeland Security - duct tape to the rescue! : Vancouver ...
Homeland Security - duct tape to the rescue! by ... Jim and Tim, the Duct
Tape Guys, call duct tape, "Homeland Security on a Roll". In ...

Homeland Security - duct tape to the rescue!
by The Duct Tape Guys Thursday February 13, 2003 at 03:00 PM

http://vancouver.indymedia.org/news/2003/02/32346.php

Use duct tape and plastic sheeting to create airtight "safe room" in your dwelling. That's what the DHS recommends. Tim suggests that an airtight room may get rather stuffy and oxygen deprived after the recommended three day inhabitance, so he suggests using Bubble Wrap - instead of plastic sheeting - when you're running out of air, you just pop the little bubbles.

 

Duct Tape Guys finally come into their own....


Just had to do it....

You remember the last time we had ourselves in as much of an uproar as is presently unfolding?--Back in the heydays of the nuclear era we were treated to clips of grade school kids practicing the maneuver that would keep them safe in case of nuclear attack--- hiding under their desks with their hands folded over their heads----(now I can't get that cute little song out of my head "DUCK and cover...DUCK and cover...)

Well, you've come a long way since then baby! 

The latest technology to keep us safe from the boogey-man is--wait for it---DUCT AND COVER!!!

(Sorry --no ditty yet but I'm sure someone must be working on it.)

Hmmm...Someone should check out if the big honchos invested heavily in Duct Tape stocks over the past few days---now there would be a smoking gun!


For Immediate Release:
http://www.ducttapeguys.com

Jim and Tim, the Duct Tape Guys, call duct tape, "Homeland Security on a Roll". In fact, they submit that no home is truly secure without duct tape. In light of the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) recent advice for Americans to
ready themselves for possible chemical and biological warfare strikes, The Duct Tape Guys have put together this helpful list:

Use duct tape and plastic sheeting to create airtight "safe room" in your dwelling. That's what the DHS recommends. Tim suggests that an airtight room may get rather stuffy and oxygen deprived after the recommended three day inhabitance, so he suggests using Bubble Wrap - instead of plastic sheeting - when you're running out of air, you just pop the little bubbles.

If you are going to choose one room of your house to make airtight for three days, Jim suggests the kitchen, "That's where the food is."

Tim disagrees. "If you have to hold it for three days you're gonna be in a world of pain! Make your airtight room the bathroom."

Or, skip the airtight room altogether and make your own biohazard suit by duct taping yourself from head to toe. "We suggest that you duct tape over an old suit or a pair of long johns. Do NOT apply the tape directly to your skin. It's binding, it pinches, and when you remove it you'll also be removing every hair on your body - talk about a world of pain!"

Note: If you want a bright orange biohazard suit like the professionals have, use DuckÆ brand's X-Factorô tape in blaze orange. Women may desire a more feminine look and opt for hot pink duct tape. Or, if you want to hide from evil doers, use camouflage duct tape.

Duct tape sticky-side-up around the perimeter of your house will stop evil microscopic bugs in their paths.

Fill a cardboard tube (like those inside rolls of toilet paper) with hundreds of duct tape baffles and duct tape this to your face covering your mouth and nose. Make sure the sticky sides of the duct tape baffles are facing away from your mouth. When you inhale, the sticky baffles will filter the air you are breathing. (Use paper towel tubes - if you want to take deeper breaths.)

Cover the whole country with a large sheet of plastic and duct tape it securely to the east and west coasts and along the Canadian and Mexican borders.

We recommend that you start stockpiling duct tape just in case the terrorists get smart and destroy our duct tape manufacturing plants. Therefore, we are issuing a GRAY ALERT! Increase your duct tape from 2.5 rolls in every house to 1.5 rolls in every room of your house.

Your SUV can make a great airtight family escape pod. Get the family in the vehicle and then hire a neighbor kid to wrap your SUV in 150 rolls worth of overlapping duct tape strips. Make sure he gets into the wheel wells and under the chassis. This will not only make sure that the SUV is airtight, it will also assure that you aren't driving the vehicle and blowing through our precious oil supplies (you'll kill two birds with one stone).

Speaking of saving gas; You can become less dependent on foreign oil using duct tape. Just make a big wad of sticky-side-out duct tape on the front bumper of your vehicle. Drive up behind another car going your direction, smack into their back bumper (give them a friendly wave and mouth "sorry") attaching your car to theirs. Put your vehicle in neutral and turn off your engine. You'll enjoy fuel economy in the 100s of miles per gallon.

And, possibly their best suggestion for using duct tape to secure our homeland: A strip of duct tape over some key mouths in Washington.

The Duct Tape Guys are the authors of five books about duct tape including "The Jumbo Duct Tape Book" and Duct Shui" (Workman Publishing), and reside online at
http://www.ducttapeguys.com
 

To purchase this book online simple click on BOOKSAMILLION.COM and enter the title

(The Jumbo Duct Tape Book)  in Search and hit Go

BOOKSAMILLION.COM

Product Cover The Jumbo Duct Tape Book (Paperback)
by Jim Berg; Tim Nyberg
Retail Price: $8.95 - Our Price: $8.95 - Club Price: $8.06
Members Save $0.89
! (10%)

Average Rating: 

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3.

ajc.com | Metro | Duct tape for security
... Wednesday afternoon. They have written six joke books on duct tape and
sell "Homeland Security On A Roll" T-shirts on their Web site. ...

Is duct tape the answer to terrorist threats?

http://www.accessatlanta.com/ajc/metro/0203/12ducttape.html

By JEFFRY SCOTT
Atlanta Journal-Constitution Staff Writer

When the U.S. Department of Homeland Security recommended Americans use duct tape to secure their homes against biological attack, it wasn't the first time the ubiquitous, all-purpose adhesive tape had been pressed -- and stuck -- into the service of its country.

Duct tape started in the military.

Sure, in the South, the tape has long been the subject of jokes. Comic Jeff Foxworthy says this is sign number 199 that you might be redneck: "You consider duct tape and tarp straps necessities for auto body repair."

But the tape's invention was very serious business and its purpose not initially to hold mufflers and bumpers in place on old cars and pick-up trucks.

"It was actually called Duck tape, like a duck, because it repelled water like a duck's back," says Valerie Stump, a spokesperson for Henkel Consumer Adhesives, in Avon, Ohio.

The tape -- made of cloth tape coated with polyethylene resin on one side and a rubber-based sticky adhesive on the other -- was first used in the military during World War II to hold ammunition boxes together. As such, it came to be nicknamed "gun tape."

After the war, when the tape was marketed for use in the home and to seal heating ducts, it became known as duct tape. Henkel markets its tape under the brand name Duck tape.

Last year Americans bought $150 million worth of duct tape, almost half of it from Henkel, which sells the tape in 18 colors and promotes it as a fashion accessory.

The company sponsored the 4th annual Duct Tape Ball last month in Anchorage, Alaska, in which participants dressed in outfits fashioned from duct tape.

Stump said the company was not surprised when federal officials on Monday recommended citizens use duct tape and sheet plastic to seal off their homes in the event of biological attack.

"For years it's been a staple item in preparing for emergencies, such as hurricanes," said Stump.

Henkel reassured customers on its Web site Wednesday (duckproducts.com) that it is keeping the supply line of tape flowing to the biggest retailers, including Wal-Mart and Lowes.

Another big duct tape retailer, Home Depot, said it was selling more duct tape than usual, especially in New York and Washington, D.C., which are perceived targets of a terrorist attack.

"There is an elevated demand for duct tape and plastic sheeting in Atlanta as well," said Home Depot spokesperson Jerry Shields. "But we are keeping stores supplied."

At Smith Hardware on College Avenue in Decatur, the store had sold seven rolls of duct tape Wednesday morning, which is more than usual, but there was plenty still in stock, according to a clerk.

The Minneapolis -based Duct Tape Guys, Tim Nyberg, and Jim Berg, posted a "Homeland Security on a Roll" advisory on their Web page early Wednesday afternoon. They have written six joke books on duct tape and sell "Homeland Security On A Roll" T-shirts on their Web site.

Nyberg said the terrorist threat may be real, but he still found the Homeland alert amusing -- and flawed.

"They're recommending that you seal yourself into a room made airtight by duct tape and plastic wrap with three days supply of food," he said. "You don't have to worry about running out of food. You'll run out of air before that."

He recommended instead of using plastic sheeting, using bubble wrap. "That way, when you run low on air, just pop the bubbles," he said.

Another suggestion on the Web site: Instead of sealing off a room, seal off the family in in an SUV.

"Wrap the whole vehicle," he said. "It will only take about 150 rolls of tape. And not only will it be airtight, you won't be able to drive it, so it will decrease our dependency on foreign oil."

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4.

Duct Tape: Department of Homeland Security (on a Roll)
Jim and Tim, the Duct Tape Guys, call duct tape, "Homeland Security on a Roll".
In fact, they submit that no home is truly secure without duct tape. ...

http://www.octanecreative.com/ducttape/DHS/

For Immediate Release:     © ducttapeguys.com

Jim and Tim, the Duct Tape Guys, call duct tape, "Homeland Security on a Roll". In fact, they submit that no home is truly secure without duct tape. In light of the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) recent advice for Americans to ready themselves for possible chemical and biological warfare strikes, The Duct Tape Guys have put together this helpful list:

Use duct tape and plastic sheeting to create airtight "safe room" in your dwelling. That's what the DHS recommends. Tim suggests that an airtight room may get rather stuffy and oxygen deprived after the recommended three day inhabitance, so he suggests using Bubble Wrap® instead of plastic sheeting - when you're running out of air, you just pop the little bubbles.

If you are going to choose one room of your house to make airtight for three days, Jim suggests the kitchen, "That's where the food is."

Tim disagrees. "If you have to hold it for three days you're gonna be in a world of pain! Make your airtight room the bathroom."

Or, skip the airtight room altogether and make your own biohazard suit by duct taping yourself from head to toe. "We suggest that you duct tape over an old suit or a pair of long johns. Do NOT apply the tape directly to your skin. It's binding, it pinches, and when you remove it you'll also be removing every hair on your body - talk about a world of pain!"

Note: If you want a bright orange biohazard suit like the professionals have, use Duck® brand's X-Factor™ tape in blaze orange. Women may desire a more feminine look and opt for hot pink duct tape. Or, if you want to hide from evil doers, use camouflage duct tape.

Duct tape sticky-side-up around the perimeter of your house will stop evil microscopic bugs in their paths.

Fill a cardboard tube (like those inside rolls of toilet paper) with hundreds of duct tape baffles and duct tape this to your face covering your mouth and nose. Make sure the sticky sides of the duct tape baffles are facing away from your mouth. When you inhale, the sticky baffles will filter the air you are breathing. (Use paper towel tubes - if you want to take deeper breaths.)

Cover the whole country with a large sheet of plastic and duct tape it securely to the east and west coasts and along the Canadian and Mexican borders.

We recommend that you start stockpiling duct tape just in case the terrorists get smart and destroy our duct tape manufacturing plants. Therefore, we are issuing a GRAY ALERT! Increase your duct tape from 2.5 rolls in every house to 1.5 rolls in every room of your house.

Your SUV can make a great airtight family escape pod. Get the family in the vehicle and then hire a neighbor kid to wrap your SUV in 150 rolls worth of overlapping duct tape strips. Make sure he gets into the wheel wells and under the chassis. This will not only make sure that the SUV is airtight, it will also assure that you aren't driving the vehicle and blowing through our precious oil supplies (you'll kill two birds with one stone).

Speaking of saving gas; You can become less dependent on foreign oil using duct tape. Just make a big wad of sticky-side-out duct tape on the front bumper of your vehicle. Drive up behind another car going your direction, smack into their back bumper (give them a friendly wave and mouth "sorry") attaching your car to theirs. Put your vehicle in neutral and turn off your engine. You'll enjoy fuel economy in the 100s of miles per gallon.

And, possibly their best suggestion for using duct tape to secure our homeland: A strip of duct tape over some key mouths in Washington.

The Duct Tape Guys are the authors of five books about duct tape including "The Jumbo Duct Tape Book" and Duct Shui" (Workman Publishing), and reside online at www.ducttapeguys.com

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5.

Editorial: Security takes more than duct tape
... mail. Start by entering your e-mail address below: Editorial: Security
takes more than duct tape Thursday, February 13, 2003. Every ...

 

Editorial: Security takes more than duct tape

http://www.metrowestdailynews.com/news/opinion/edit02132003.htm

Thursday, February 13, 2003

Every governor in the United States of American should follow the lead of Gov. Mitt Romney and demand the federal Homeland Security funding promised after the deadly terrorist attacks of Sept. 11.

Shortly after the attack, President George W. Bush promised that $3.5 billion would be provided to first responders in emergency situations -- local police and fire departments.

But 18 months after the attack, in which several hundred New York police officers and firefighters were among the more than 3,000 to die, cities and towns have yet to see one red cent of that $3.5 billion, though most communities have had to spend millions to provide the increased security demanded since the attack.

Boston, for instance, has spent $40 million since Sept. 11 to beef up its security system and prepare for the additional attacks federal officials warn are coming, and every community in this country has done the same to a greater or lesser degree.

Homeland Security czar Tom Ridge is suggesting citizens make sure they know the location of bomb and fallout shelters in their communities. He's also suggesting citizens know their city or town emergency warning system. But many towns no longer have emergency warning systems, nor shelters, in place, and they don't have the resources needed to revive them. Communities that do have shelters don't have the money to stock them with food, water, medical supplies and the other things necessary to keep a large number of people safe for days or weeks or months.

Ridge is warning that another attack is imminent, possibly this weekend, somewhere on the East Coast. So New England states -- all them facing huge budget deficits -- are forced to bear the cost of additional increased security, while, at the same time, Bush and Congress continue to argue over Homeland Security funding.

State and community leaders have done what they can to secure the homeland. There is increased security on waterfronts, power plants, bridges, airports and other sensitive, vulnerable areas. It has already cost hundreds of millions of dollars, and, as Ridge says, there are still plenty of soft, unprotected targets for terrorists to hit.

There's nothing wrong with the feds telling us what we should do to protect our families from terrorist attacks. What we'd like to hear more about is what the government is doing to make us more safe -- not by fighting Iraq, but by preparing local police, firefighters and first responders for the kind of attacks Washington assures us are coming.

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6.

Duck Products, Duck® brand Duct Tape and More!
In response to the Department of Homeland Security's recommendation
to keep duct tape on-hand in preparing for a biological attack. ...

http://www.duckproducts.com/

 

In response to the Department of Homeland Security's recommendation to keep duct tape on-hand in preparing for a biological attack

Due to the heightened demand and accelerated sales of duct tape as a result of the Department of Homeland Security's recommendation to keep duct tape on-hand in preparing for a biological attack, Henkel Consumer Adhesives has increased duct tape production by 40%. In order to ensure that store supply levels are replenished, HCA is utilizing a rapid response inventory control system and working closely with retailers.

Recent News Headlines Tout Duct Tape
Successful in Treating Warts
Cincinnati Children’s Physician Releases Study


Monday, October 14, 2002, Cincinnati, Ohio -- A physician at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center has determined that a novel way of treating warts -- duct tape -- is less expensive, less painful and more convenient than currently used methods.

“We don’t know for sure why it works, but it may involve stimulation of the patient’s immune system through local irritation,” says Rick Focht, MD, a fellow in the division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at Cincinnati Children’s and the study’s lead author. The study is published in the October issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.


* Henkel Consumer Adhesives does not recommend or promote duck tape for use in treating, curing or preventing any disease, such as the removal of warts. The use of duck tape to remove warts is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and further scientific study is necessary to evaluate and establish the safety and effectiveness of this use.


Cincinnati Children’s Physician Releases Study

A variety of therapies are used to treat warts, with varying success rates. The current treatment of choice is cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen. This method involves freezing a wart with liquid nitrogen for 10 to 20 seconds every two to three weeks. A major drawback of this procedure is that children with warts experience a burning discomfort and are quite fearful of the therapy. In addition, cryotherapy requires frequent clinic visits for success.

Although there had been reports of tape occlusion therapy to treat warts, it had never been studied, at least until Dr. Focht came along. He recruited 61 patients between the ages of 3 and 22, and 51 completed the study. These patients were divided into two groups, with 25 receiving cryotherapy and 26 sent home with a supply of standard duct tape.

The first piece of duct tape, cut as close to the size of the wart as possible, was applied in the outpatient setting by a nurse. Patients or their parents were told to leave the tape in place for six days.

After six days, they removed the tape, soaked the area in water and gently “debrided” the wart with an emery board or pumice stone. The tape was left off overnight and reapplied the following morning. The treatment was continued for up to two months, or until the wart resolved, whichever came first.

Tape occlusion therapy was “significantly more effective” than cryotherapy, according to Dr. Focht. Warts went away in 22 of the 26 patients who used duct tape, and most warts disappeared within 28 days of initiating therapy. Only 15 of the 26 who received cryotherapy experienced complete resolution of their warts.

“Duct tape is more practical for parents and patients to use,” says Dr. Focht. “There was also better compliance in our study within the duct tape group, primarily due to ease of administration.”
Warts are a common complaint in pediatric medicine, occurring in up to 10 percent of all children. They are benign growths caused by the human papillomaviruses and can occur on any area of the skin. Peak incidence is between the ages of 12 and 16.

Cincinnatiti Children's Hospital Medical Center.


Click here to view a PDF of the study summary

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7.

Duct tape assumes a vital defense role
... Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle, D-South Dakota, a critic of American
security efforts, has made duct tape his favorite sound bite. ...

Duct tape assumes a vital defense role

By Sarah Sue Ingram
Daily Press

February 13, 2003

Crawford Smith, dressed in coat and tie, stood in line at the Hampton Home Depot on his lunch hour Wednesday to buy four rolls of silver duct tape.

He thinks his life might depend on it.

"I wanted to take precautionary measures," Smith said, adding that he heard Tom Ridge, secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, tell Americans early this week to start stockpiling certain items in case of a terrorist attack involving chemical, biological or radiological weapons.

Besides, Smith said, "In case there isn't an event, duct tape is something I can use later. I bought enough for myself and for my daughter - they have small children. After 9-11, I don't think we can underestimate what can happen. I'd rather err on the side of being safe."

Smith and a few Hampton Roads residents have gone to stores in the past few days to prepare for a possible terrorist attack. They've been spurred by Homeland Security officials' recommendations advising Americans to prepare for a possible attack by stockpiling food, blankets, water, flashlights and other items.

In addition, those officials said, people interested in surviving a terrorist attack should buy plastic sheeting and duct tape, so they can seal off an area inside their homes to protect themselves against air contaminated by biological, radiological or chemical terrorism.

Never in American history has simple duct tape assumed such prominence.

Though the Homeland Security Department mentioned it Monday as only one item to stockpile, it has emerged as a symbol of American readiness - or lack thereof.

After the Bush administration's Monday warning to begin stockpiling, some experts in germ, chemical and radiological warfare scoffed at the idea that someone could insulate themselves from harm with some plastic sheeting and duct tape.

Critics of the administration questioned if the warning was a way of scaring people and drumming up support for the invasion of Iraq.

Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle, D-South Dakota, a critic of American security efforts, has made duct tape his favorite sound bite.

"We have to do better than duct tape as our response to homeland defense," he says.

While Smith and some other Hampton Roads residents have rushed to buy the items on the Homeland Security Department's list, most have not.

Most shoppers at Home Depot and similar home improvement stores Wednesday dismissed the idea of buying duct tape, plastic sheeting and the other items, saying they don't consider the danger in Hampton Roads imminent. They also said they don't think duct tape is a surefire defense against an attack.

Don Richardson, of Hampton's Beach Hardware, said his store hasn't seen an increase in sales of duct tape, plastic or other items on the Homeland Security list.

Ditto for Wal-Mart, said Tom Williams, a corporate spokesman.

Home Depot hasn't exactly been besieged, but sales are definitely up, said Jackie Tate at the company's home office in Atlanta. She called it "a spike in duct tape sales."

Costs for the big rolls of plastic? A 20-foot by 100-foot roll costs $39.97, 10-feet by 100-feet $24.97, and 10-feet by 25-feet $10.97, Walsh said.

The Hampton Home Depot sold 11 rolls of plastic sheeting Tuesday - a normal week's sales - and 26 rolls since Monday's announcement, said salesclerk Jason O'Conner.

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8.

Philadelphia Daily News | 02/13/2003 | THE DUCT TAPE GUYS
... Q: So what is your position on the Homeland Security Department advocating duct-
tape use? A: We've maintained that duct tape is homeland security on a roll. ... 

THE DUCT TAPE GUYS
THEY'VE WRITTEN 5 BOOKS ABOUT IT

http://www.philly.com/mld/dailynews/5170490.htm

Believe it or not, someone has actually written a book about duct tape uses.

In fact, they've written several.

Jim Berg and Tim Nyberg - or "Jim and Tim, the Duct Tape Guys" as they prefer to be known - have written five books on the subject (including "The Jumbo Duct Tape Book") and have a sixth coming out in the fall.

They even have their own Web site, www.ducttapeguys.com. They added a new section this week reacting to the Department of Homeland Security's suggestion that Americans fortify their homes with plastic sheeting and duct tape.

We checked in with Nyberg at his home in Minnesota last night.

Q: How did you meet Jim?

A: I married his sister.

Q: How did you two guys bond over duct tape?(no pun intended)

A: Hah, hah. The real story is

we were sitting around his sister's house on Christmas Eve in 1993 and there was a power outage. He was getting hungry and the food wasn't prepared and he said, "If I knew where the outage was, I could fix it with duct tape." I said, "What do you mean, fix it with duct tape?" Then his wife said, "He fixes everything with duct tape." They started listing off some uses. Fortunately, my lap-top battery was charged up and we all sat around in the dark and started brainstorming ideas. When I got home, I put it all together into a book with illustrations and sent it out to some publishers. The publisher that picked it up [who dug it out of the garbage] said, "This is good." He had kind of a duct-tape joke going through college so he was well-acquainted with duct tape being funny.

Q: So Jim converted you to being a duct-tape enthusiast?

A: Yes. He was always a duct-tape user, probably since he was in diapers. I was a later convert. I was brought up on lesser tapes, like masking tape and Scotch tape. Jim showed me how duct tape is so strong that people have actually towed cars out of ditches with it - yet you can rip it with your own hands. It's gender-equal. Gals can use it as easily as guys.

Q: So what is your position on the Homeland Security Department advocating duct- tape use?

A: We've maintained that duct tape is homeland security on a roll. As soon as they named it [the department], we thought, "No home is secure without duct tape."

Q: What do you think of how they said to use it?

A: Well, to be perfectly honest, I think it is going to take more than plastic sheeting and duct tape to prevent chemical and biological warfare damage. But if you look at the guys in the biohazard removal suits, their cuffs around their wrists and ankles are always duct-taped over the suit to make it airtight. So there is something to be said. But I don't know about airtight rooms and germ warfare. But who knows? I'm not a scientist. I'm just a duct-tape pro.

Q: What do you think about stores selling out of duct tape in the wake of the announcement?

A: I think it's about time that America stocks up on duct tape - not just for homeland security - but it's nice to have it around the house. I think the national average is 2.5 rolls per household. We'd like to issue a gray alert and get it up to 2.5 rolls in every room of the house. And in your vehicle, too.

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9.

nbc4.com - Politics - Lucky Duck ... Or Duct Tape?
... Some of us will be lucky ducks and some of us will be stuck with duct tape.
Welcome to the age of pseudo-security. Have a nice day. You don't count. ...

Lucky Duck ... Or Duct Tape?
Tom Sherwood, Political Reporter

http://www.nbc4.com/politics/1970520/detail.html

 

POSTED: 1:20 p.m. EST February 11, 2003
UPDATED: 1:33 p.m. EST February 11, 2003

 

So now security bureaucrats, my word is "securicrats," are recommending that you have three days of water, batteries for your portable radio and an x-amount of plastic and duct tape to seal off outside air for a protected room in your home.

Or, use your bomb shelter if you still have one.

The Notebook is all for reasonable precautions, but can't help wondering a few things.

Like, for example, does such security warnings mean that every business office, retail store or say, movie theater, needs to stock the same supplies, just in case? Or, are we to assume that a terrorist attack will occur while most of us are at home with our families? Or, do we assume we'll be able to rush home to put in effect our plan?

What if you're riding underground on Metro? What is Metro's plan to protect its customers?

What if you're watching the movie About Schmidt, already deeply depressing enough, and suddenly you're stuck for a few hours, a few days? Will there be a raid on the candy counter and fountain drinks? Will doors be sealed with glue-coated film?

And, what about elementary, high schools and colleges? Are schools required to stock water and duct tape, enough for everyone? How about houses of worship? And what if you're at a Saturday morning soccer game?

Should a significant dreaded attack of some type occur, the members of the President's team and the members of Congress will be whisked away to undisclosed, "secure locations." What a jumble and scramble that will be, and you'll be trying to unroll the plastic sheets and trying to keep the duct tape from tangling, if you have any.

Before you call to complain, the Notebook certainly is not trying to make light of serious terrorism concerns. But, as the government "securicrats" are warning us to prepare for something, sometime, somewhere, you might ask yourself how realistic is it that you will be at home? And if you're not at home, then where will you be? Some of us will be lucky ducks and some of us will be stuck with duct tape. Welcome to the age of pseudo-security.

 

Have a nice day.

You don't count. In the drumbeat of war to save the world for democracy, President Bush's press spokesman Ari Fleischer was asked recently by a journalist about the lack of Democracy in the Nation's Capital. The question came from Russell Mokhiber, White House reporter for the D.C.-based Corporate Crime Reporter.

Part of the exchange follows:
Russell Mokhiber: The President has repeatedly said that he wants to bring democracy to Iraq. But here in the District of Columbia, citizens have no elected representatives in Congress ... What is the President doing to bring democracy to the District of Columbia?

Fleischer: Per the Constitution, the District of Columbia is a unique entity. The President has expressed no desire to change the representation that the District of Columbia was given by the framers. And I don't really think you can equate the District of Columbia being a democracy with Iraq's failure to be a democracy, and it is in fact of course a totalitarian state.

Well, you know where we stand.

As local activist Mark David Richards likes to point out, the original U.S. Constitution also kept blacks and women from voting. Now it's just blacks and women and everyone else who live in the Nation's Capital.

 

Watch that security bunker.

D.C. Delegate Eleanor Homes Norton was hosting a tourism fare on Capitol Hill this week. It's a way for her and 40 tourist attractions, hotels and restaurants to appeal to Capitol Hill, its 56 new members and all the staffs.

Norton's intent was to show them the city is open for business, despite the slow, well not so slow, creep of this security measure or that security measure steadily closing off the Nation's Capital.

 

Water ... water ... water.

No, this is not a security item. In all the talk before the council last week on inaccurate water bills, the Notebook found it actually learned something and is pleased to pass it on. How much do residents pay for water?

Your bill describes water usage in "cubic feet" and says you pay 4.496 cents per cubic foot for water and sewage. Translated that means you pay 4.5 cents for every 7.5 gallons of water.

Back to Duct Tape Security Index Page

 

10.

Duct Tape Headline News
... air tight with duct tape. Hey, we've always said, that duct tape is
homeland security on a roll... But, we were just wondering, if ...

http://www.octanecreative.com/ducttape/dtnews.html

Versatile duct tape now no-no for sealing ducts
Ventura County Star
April 17, 2002

BERKELEY (AP) -- When two scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory said duct tape shouldn't be used to seal ducts, they made national news.

Many reports took an amused look at the popular tape, which is used for a lot more than sealing ducts. The idea that the tape might not be good for its intended use struck many as hilarious.

But companies that make the tape weren't chuckling when the state issued emergency regulations based on the lab's study. The regulations prohibited contractors from using cloth-backed tape by itself to seal ducts.

Today, the California Energy Commission is scheduled to rule on an industry request for a three-year suspension of those regulations.

The request came from duct tape makers Tyco Adhesives and Shurtape Technologies, which are
questioning the techniques used in the study by researchers Max H. Sherman and Iain S. Walker in 1998.

The study said the tape is ineffective in sealing ducts because the heat shrinks and curls the tape, causing leaks. The scientists estimated the value of energy lost through leaky ducts each year in California at $400 million.

The tape makers and a trade association say that, when used as directed, cloth-backed duct tape works fine. The tape is approved by manufacturers for use only on certain types of joints, and always in conjunction with a plastic or metal collar, say industry proponents.

California's restrictions on cloth-backed duct tape became effective Jan. 1. The tape only can be used in conjunction with other sealing methods.

 


 

No relaxing restrictions on use of duct tape, says state
Ventura County Star
April 19, 2002

Sacramento- -- California has no intention of relaxing restrictions on the use of duct tape to seal air ducts.

In a unanimous 4-oh ruling, the California Energy Commission rejected a bid by tape makers to suspend restrictions on using the tape in building homes and offices.

The restrictions were imposed after a 1998 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory study found the cloth-backed tape can shrivel up and fail when ducts get hot. That creates leaks that add up to millions of dollars in energy losses.

The emergency regulations forbid the use of duct tape alone to join factory built sections of flex ducting. Instead, the tape can only be used along with a sealant called mastic and collars made of steel or plastic.

Duct tape makers Tyco Adhesives and Shurtape Technologies appealed the decision, asking for a three-year suspension of the new rules. They complain the regulations discourage the use of duct tape at all.

The makers say the lab's testing techniques were inaccurate. The lab is now conducting another round of tests. A Tyco spokesman told the commission it may return in six to eight months to ask for another ruling.
(The Oakland Tribune)


 

“Bear-proof” suit to be put to the test
03 December 3, 2001, by Alison Motluk

A Canadian man and a three-metre, 585-kilogramme Kodiak bear will face off on 9 December, in an attempt to test a handmade, purportedly bear-proof suit. 

The suit and its maker, Troy Hurtubise of North Bay, Ontario, won a 1998 Ig Nobel prize for Safety and Engineering and an entry in the 2002 Guinness Book of World Records for the most expensive research suit ever constructed. 

Fifteen years of tinkering and US$100,000 have gone into the design, which incorporates plastic, rubber, chainmail, galvanised steel, titanium - and thousands of metres of duct tape. 

The suit has proven itself to be virtually indestructible. It has survived two strikes with a 136-kilogramme tree trunk, 18 collisions with a 3-ton truck at 50 kilometres an hour, and numerous strikes by arrows, bullets, axes and baseball bats. "I've never had a bruise," says Hurtubise. But the suit has never come up against the very thing it is meant to protect against - a Grizzly bear. 

On 9 December, in an undisclosed location in western Canada, that will change. In a "controlled attack", the Kodiak, a larger, heavier subspecies of the Grizzly, will put it to the test. click here for the whole story

Follow-up Story: The Bear Wouldn’t Attack!
The first live tests of Troy Hurtubise's grizzly-proof suit have found that its best protective feature is its bizarre appearance. Hurtubise donned the suit and squared up to a 145-kilogram (320-pound) female grizzly last week but the bear just found it too weird.

When confronted by Hurtubise in the Ursus Mark VI suit, the bear smelled a human, but saw an alien. "There's no grizzly that's going to come near you in that suit," the bear handler told him, after he spent 10 minutes in a cage with the cowering animal.

Hurtubise has been tinkering with his bear-proof garment for 15 years and has been the subject of a television documentary and the recipient of an IgNobel prize. The grizzly test was supposed to be the first live encounter, and was part of a trio of try-outs in British Columbia, Canada. click here for the rest of the story


 

Duct Tape Repairs Antarctic Exhibition Sled
This news item was published Feb. 11, 2001 by the StarTribune:
The Bancroft-Arnesen Antarctica expedition, already delayed by bad weather and then a lack of wind, came to a temporary stop Thursday when one of their sleds was torn by sharp glacial ice.

Ann Bancroft, 45, of Scandia, MN, and Liv Arnesen, 47, of Norway, are attempting to become the first women to cross the continent by ski. They stopped less than halfway down the 80-mile, 8,000-foot-high Shackleton Glacier after ice ripped a three-foot tear on a sled that is carrying 250 pounds of food and equipment, Arnesen reported by phone to their expedition headquarters in Minneapolis.

They repaired the sled with duct tape and a wooden pole and searched their maps for a safer path to avoid heavily crevassed portions of the glacier where temperatures had warmed and then dropped below freezing, producing razorlike snowdrifts.
Fifty miles down the glacier is the Ross Ice Shelf, a floating slab of ocean ice bigger than France. Once the two reach that, they will officially have become the first women to cross the continent by ski and sail, but they still will need to use their parasails to cover 470 more miles to reach the U.S. base McMurdo Station.
(by Jerry Zgoda)


 

Alligator Caught After Wandering Onto School Field
POSTED: 6:42 a.m. EDT August 27, 2002
WILMINGTON, N.C. -- An unwanted alligator has been shipped to Pender County after being captured at a Wilmington high school.

A wildlife official and a crew that included maintenance workers and a teacher used duct tape to bind and muzzle the animal at Ashley High School. It was then carted away to Holly Shelter Game Land.

Jimmy English, who is authorized by the state to remove wild animals, says developers filled in a lake popular with alligators to build the school. Now, there are only retention ponds at the site.

The incident was the latest in a busy week for wildlife officials. They've received six complaints requiring the removals of three alligators during that time.

 


 

Duct Tape recommended for biohazard prevention in “The New Yorker”
A "Talk of the Town" article, the 10/15/01 issue of "The New Yorker" endorsed duct tape as a key component in biohazard protective gear: "It's your best friend," Schwartz said [Bruce Schwartz is a warehouse manager of a company selling gas masks and other protective equipment in Manhattan.]. "You can use it to seal up your windows so nothing can seep in. You can use it to secure your bootees and gloves to your suit. It's the greatest." "Hey, do you guys have duct tape at home?" the salesman asked them [customers]. "Because that's your best friend right there."

To view the entire article, click here: NewYorker.com
See more duct tape biohazard control; click here.


 

Live Alligator Shipped; UPS Probes
ATLANTA (AP) - The United Parcel Service is investigating how it shipped a live 5-foot alligator overnight to New York City.
Workers who checked out a leaking box on a company truck Thursday found the alligator, its snout and feet bound with duct tape.

"He was not very happy,'' UPS spokesman Norman Black said Friday. (Yeah, but he got there, thanks to Duct Tape!)
New York animal control officials seized the 40-pound alligator, which was not injured.

Atlanta-based UPS prohibits the shipment of live animals. Black declined to say where the animal originated or how the package was labeled. "Somebody lied to us about the contents of the package,'' he said.

P.S. It is interesting to note here that UPS doesn't allow packages to be secured with duct tape. I wonder if they will rethink this decision now that they all still have their limbs after dealing with the secret cargo? --- The Duct Tape Guys


 

Duct Tape Helps Wink Catch Some Winks While Alligator Awaits
A man who got lost in a Florida swamp made sure he didn't get attacked by alligators while he slept - by taping himself high up in a tree. Gemini Wink had been using duct tape to mark his trail when he went off on an alligator trek, reports the Tampa Tribune.
After taking lots of pictures of the reptiles he realised he was lost and night was falling. So to make sure he didn't get nipped in the night, he climbed a 40 foot tree, secured himself with the duct tape and went to sleep.

Police found him, still up the tree, after friends had grown worried when he hadn't returned from his walk. Police started a search, and eventually found him quarter of a mile away from his friend's house. Wink says: "I'll definitely visit again although I'll probably stay out of the swamps."

 


 

Day care sued after director duct taped child to a wall
HUDSON, Mass. (AP) - The parents of a child who was duct-taped to a wall at a day care center have sued the owner and several employees, saying the incident was part of a pattern of abuse.The parents, along with two other families, sued A Place to Grow Inc. claiming their infants were also force-fed, exposed to infectious diseases and spent nap time with blankets over their heads. Diane Davis, the center's director, and three employees were fired following the duct-tape incident. According to a report by state investigators, Davis said she had been talking to a parent about the versatility of duct tape and decided to find out if it really did "work on everything."  The child was not physically harmed. The center was closed in March. Investigators said staff also quieted children by spraying water in their face and neglected to give some children their prescribed medications. Suzanne Foley, the owner of the center, declined to comment on the lawsuits.


 

A Not-So-Clean Getaway
The bozo criminal for today wasn't aware of Bozo Rule #3254 which clearly states that, while versatile, duct tape isn't appropriate for every job. From Albuquerque, New Mexico comes the story of bozo Larry Hamilton who held up a dry cleaning establishment and then made what he thought was a clean getaway. Except for one thing, and that's where the duct tape comes in. Our bozo had used one strip of tape to cover up the license plate. He probably should have used two or maybe three pieces, as the tops and bottoms of the numbers were still visible. The clerk was able to decipher the plate and the cops tracked our bozo down less than two hours later. (source unknown - will credit if provided)


 

Duct Tape Assists in Hiding a Helecopter (almost)
A Massachusetts man, Antonio Santonastaso, was arrested for stealing a helicopter from a Norwood, Massachusetts flight school. Where and how can you hide a helicopter so nobody will notice? Santonastaso figured nobody would see it if he parked it in his neighbor’s cow pasture, put blankets and tarps over it, and wrapped the whole thing up with duct tape. Thereby, in his mind at least, making the helicopter virtually invisible. Didn’t work.--- from the Boston Globe May 31, 2000

 


 

Tuesday November 30 12:53 PM ET
Man Makes Mummy Out of His Wife
PHOENIX, Ariz. (Reuters) - Robert Horton either does not trust his wife or loves his money. In either case, he was not about to forfeit the $170 he had posted to get her out of jail. So, he took matters into his own hands. Faced with the sticky situation that she might not show up for a Monday court date, Horton grabbed some duct tape and went to work on Belinda, his 44-year-old spouse, trussing her up so that she looked like a ``mummy,'' police said.

He taped her mouth tightly shut, bound her legs from her ankles to knees and secured her arms across her chest at their Phoenix home. Then Horton, 52, placed his bound and silent wife into the family car, drove her to Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix and dropped her off at the security officer's desk as a sheriff's deputy watched in amazement.

``He said something like, 'Here she is,'' said Sgt. Dave Trombi, a sheriff's spokesman. Witnesses said she looked like a mummy.

Authorities said the woman was arrested Nov. 19 for investigation of obstructing a highway or public thoroughfare, aggravated assault on a police officer, failing to obey a police officer and resisting arrest. She was released five days later.

This time, there was no resisting. Trombi said she would not even talk to authorities once they performed the delicate task of removing the tape. Authorities said they were considering whether to bring charges against her husband.

Trombi said the moral of the story is a simple one: ``Read the warning on the duct tape label -- it's intended for everything other than human use or abuse.''

We’ve always held that Duct Tape in the wrong hands (or stupid hands, in this case) is a dangerous weapon. - Jim and Tim


 

Duck Tape Drunk Restraint
In a small town on the west coast of Vancouver Island, a roll of duct tape saved the day. One night after a local dance, a drunken stranger decided to steal the town's only fire truck in the middle of the night. Fortunately, the caretaker heard the commotion outside and chased the man down as he was about to drive away. The caretaker wrestled the stranger to the ground but he had no way to restrain him for any length of time. Another person came to assist and they found a way to restrain the stranger until the police could come the next morning. With no rope to be found, they duct taped the would-be fire truck robber to a telephone pole in the middle of the parking lot where he remained for five hours until the authorities arrived!! --- submitted by Glen Smith

 


 

From the Pioneer Press (Twin Cities, MN) Mon, Feb. 11, 2002
Surviving on Duct Tape, Adrenaline
by Tom Powers
Pioneer Press Columnist

SALT LAKE CITY
It is well known that most guys have a fixation with duct tape. Why fiddle with tiny clamps or messy glues when a nice wad of duct tape will hold almost anything together?

It works on everything from water pipes to rake handles to coffee cups.

"Honey, there's a hole in my sneaker. Where's the duct tape?"

Now we discover that it also is an important tool in the Olympic sport of skeleton. Beginners often wrap themselves in the silvery wonder to make sure they don't lose a body part while careening down the frozen track.

"There is a lot of duct tape involved," said Chris Soule, recalling his own first run. "Arms, shoes, anything I could cover with duct tape. In the beginning stages, people will use it all the time."

That's because this is not a delicate sport.

"You could smash your head," noted Soule, a member of the U.S. men's team. "I've pulled a guy up off the track after he got knocked out."

They are the Olympic daredevils, sliding at speeds in excess of 80 mph, headfirst, down an icy, curved track. Beneath them is a tiny sled with runners so low that the slider's chin often touches the ice.

Bobsledders are virtually encased in their sleds. Lugers ride feet first. In skeleton, the sliders go face first. They wouldn't have it any other way.

"Bobsled is the champagne of thrills," said Jim Shea, one of Soule's teammates. "Skeleton is the moonshine of thrills."

"There is nothing like this!" said Tristan Gale, a 5-foot-2 pepper pot from New Mexico. "Everyone should try it at least once!"

Perhaps taken aback by the disbelieving looks directed her way, she added: "No, seriously."

Well, let me check my life insurance policy. I want to make sure I'm covered in case I depart this earth via an act of foolishness.

In fact, there is some debate as to why the sport is called "skeleton." One theory is that the sled sort of resembles a skeleton. Another is that's all that is left of you at the end of the run.

"Skeleton is the same in all languages," said Gale. "Say 'skeleton' in Europe and you get the same look you get here: 'You're crazy!' "

Members of the American team have several things in common. First, they admittedly are adrenaline junkies. They love the rush that accompanies their bullet-like flight down the track. They smile in delight when they talk about the G-forces that make it difficult for them to lift their heads during a run.

"You finish and your eyeballs are huge!" said Gale. "It's such a blast."

Second, they all experienced the same sensation at the completion of their first-ever run. That's the critical moment. Either people stagger to their feet, wait until they stop shaking and then hurry away as fast as they can. Or they want to do it again.

Members of the Olympic team all wanted to do it again.

"I haven't told my mother yet," team member Lincoln DeWitt said with a laugh. "She was pretty nervous until she saw it. Then she was really nervous."

"I have been cliff-jumping, mountain-bike racing, I've done a lot of crazy things," Soule said. "You really can't compare this to anything else."

Those with Olympic-level talent insist the sport is not dangerous. They know how to shift their weight properly to negotiate a turn. They also are experts at keeping their chins, as well as other important body parts, firmly attached.

"It's safer than people think it is," said Soule.

That could be true because most of us consider it about as safe as walking into a biker bar and announcing: "If somebody doesn't move that Harley from in front of my Oldsmobile, I'm going to kick some butt."

The competition takes place on Feb. 20, and the American team isn't favored to win any medals. Those probably will go to the Europeans. But that could change in a few years. The sport is rapidly gaining popularity in the United States.

That's not hard to understand. Picture a kid going down a hill on his sled. Is he going feet first or headfirst? Exactly. So it's a natural for youngsters.

In a few years, some of those boys and girls will make their first skeleton run at an Olympic tryout camp. They will start one-third or perhaps halfway up the track. Nobody ever makes his or her first run from the top. The heart palpitations would be too great.

From there, it's up to them. If they want to do it again, they have potential. And it's not a real expensive sport, either.

All it takes to get started is nerves, a sled and a few rolls of duct tape.
©Pioneer Press / www.twincities.com

 


 

Duct Tape mends broken buckle, wins bronze metal for snowboarder Chris Klug


PARK CITY, UTAH

Of all the problems Chris Klug has faced in the past few years, a broken ski-boot buckle didn't rate very high. So instead of panicking when it snapped just before his Olympic bronze medal run, he worked a little magic with duct tape and a piece of metal and let 'er rip.
The buckle held. When he slid to a stop after blazing down the parallel giant slalom course, Klug could barely believe he had won an Olympic medal only 19 months after receiving a liver transplant. Philipp Schoch of Switzerland won the gold and Sweden's Richard Richardsson the silver. (from a story by Rachel Blount, StarTribune Staff Writer)

 

PARK CITY, Utah (AP)

Glad simply to be alive, let alone at the pinnacle of his sport, liver transplant survivor Chris Klug put a whole new twist on the notion of an Olympic miracle.

Using duct tape to bind together a broken boot buckle for his final race, Klug persevered and won the bronze medal Friday in parallel giant slalom snowboarding. (from an AP story by Eddie Pells)

Back to Duct Tape Security Index Page


 

11.

CNN.com - Duct tape sales rise amid terror fears - Feb. 11, 2003
... automobile, radios with extra batteries, and plastic sheeting and duct tape to seal ... and
the events happening around you Source: Homeland Security Secretary Tom ...

Duct tape sales rise amid terror fears

From Jeanne Meserve
CNN
Tuesday, February 11, 2003 Posted: 7:35 PM EST (0035 GMT) 

http://www.cnn.com/2003/US/02/11/emergency.supplies/


WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Americans have apparently heeded the U.S. government's advice to prepare for terror attacks, emptying hardware store shelves of duct tape.

On Tuesday, less than 24 hours after U.S. Fire Administrator David Paulison described a list of useful items, stores in the greater Washington, D.C. area reported a surge in sales of plastic sheeting, duct tape, and other emergency items.

These items, Paulison said, can be helpful after a biological, chemical or radiological attack.

A Lowe's hardware store in Alexandria, Virginia, said every roll of duct tape has been sold. Another Alexandria Home Depot store reported sales of duct tape tripled overnight.

"Everything that was on that newscast, we are selling a lot of it," said Rich Pierce with a Home Depot in the D.C. area.

In his advisory, Paulison recommended that households have on hand three days worth of water and food; an emergency supply kit for both home and automobile; radios with extra batteries; and plastic sheeting and duct tape to seal windows and doors. (What to do)

With concerns growing about al Qaeda's interest in acquiring weapons of mass destruction, Paulison cautioned that aid after an attack could be hard to come by, at least initially.

He said that in the first 48 to 72 hours of an emergency, many Americans will likely to have to look after themselves.(Red Cross on preparedness)

If an attack occurs, Paulison said, households should tune in to local media outlets and not evacuate unless they are told to do so.

President Bush's Homeland Security Council raised the national threat level from yellow to orange on Friday. Orange indicates a "high" risk of terrorist attack, and yellow indicates an "elevated" risk.

The level was raised in part because of a high amount of "chatter" being intercepted by intelligence agencies.

When the Department of Homeland Security urged Americans on Monday to take steps to prepare for a possible attack, it said the advice was intended not as a "dire" warning but as cautionary advice.

Back to Duct Tape Security Index Page

 

12.

nbc6.net - News - Experts Skeptical About Duct Tape Defense ...
... Randy Larsen, director of the ANSER Institute for Homeland Security, a nonprofit
research ... said that when his mother asked if she should buy duct tape, he told ...

Experts Skeptical About Duct Tape Defense Strategy

http://http://www.nbc6.net/news/1976539/detail.html

Government Advises Taping, Sealing Windows In Event Of Bioterror Attack
NBC 6 News Team
 

POSTED: 4:10 p.m. EST February 13, 2003

 

Of all the government's tips for protecting yourself against a terrorist attack, it is duct tape that seems to have seized the public's attention. But terrorism experts are skeptical about how much good it would do.

The idea is that tape and plastic sheets could provide a sealed-off room in case of chemical or biological attack. The government recommends keeping duct tape and scissors on hand, as well as pre-cut sheets of plastic for sealing the doors, windows and vents of an internal room at home.

The government says that in the event of an attack, people should turn off all ventilation, go to that room and seal it with the tape and sheeting. If the room has 10 square feet of floor space per person, it should provide enough air for up to five hours, the government says.

In 2001, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tenn., reported on tests to see if this strategy would help protect people living near stockpiles of chemical weapons.

Results showed that "in some cases it might not buy you much protection, but in other cases it seemed to be buying a lot of protection," said Oak Ridge researcher John Sorensen.

It is not clear why results varied so much between the 10 or so homes where researchers measured how tightly such rooms were sealed against air flow, he said. At best, it was "maybe providing up to 75 to 90 percent reduction in potential exposure," he said Thursday.

In any case, "we could not envision it being used for more than an hour or two," he said.

Some terrorism experts are wary of the tape-and-plastic strategy.

"It just doesn't make a lot of sense to me," said Greg Evans, director of the Center for the Study of Bioterrorism and Emerging Infections at the St. Louis University School of Public Health.

One problem, he said, is that people wouldn't know when to seal themselves in, because terrorists would release germs or chemical agents without warning.

"We're only going to know about it when we start coming down sick, and that's too late to go into a " safe-room," he said. For biological attack, the first symptoms might not appear for days, he noted.

What's more, he said he doubts a room could be completely sealed, meaning tiny amounts of potent chemical or biological weapons could still seep in.

Randy Larsen, director of the ANSER Institute for Homeland Security, a nonprofit research institute in Arlington, Va., agreed that the strategy is useless against biological attack as well as bombs or plunging jetliners.

In a chemical attack, "it might be of some limited value," he said, "but do you have adequate warning? Do you have time to do it? Can you really seal off the room?"

At least, he said, the hoopla trained the public's attention on preparing for a terrorist attack. And authorities have already recommended plenty of more useful steps to take, he said. Among other things, federal officials have said Americans should take basic disaster-preparation steps such as maintaining a three-day stockpile of food and water.

Larsen said that when his mother asked if she should buy duct tape, he told her: "Mom, go do the other things on the list first. Then if you want to do it, go ahead and do it."

 

Previous Stories:

Back to Duct Tape Security Index Page

 

13.

  theory.lcs.mit.edu/~rivest/ducttape.txt
... Trying to regulate ``duct tape'' or register its users is foolish and a waste ... and
head of that laboratory's Cryptography and Information Security research group ...
 
 
			
CRYPTOGRAPHY AS DUCT TAPE
			-------------------------

Ronald L. Rivest
Associate Director, MIT Laboratory for Computer Science
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617)253-5800; fax (617)258-9738; (617)646-0504(home phone and fax)
rivest@theory.lcs.mit.edu
http://theory.lcs.mit.edu/~rivest

Version of June 12, 1997.

Senators of the Senate Commerce and Judiciary Committees

I am writing you regarding an issue of cryptographic policy that faces
the nation.  In particular, I am writing to ask that you do not
support regulations or legislation that support cryptographic ``key
recovery.''  I believe that the proposal to use or require key
recovery for law enforcement purposes is very poorly justified, very
costly for the supposed benefits it would achieve, dangerous to its
users, and based on serious misperceptions about how cryptography fits
into the modern information infrastructure.  In this note I would like
to emphasize this last point, by carrying through the metaphor that
cryptography is really the electronic equivalent of ``duct tape'':
enormously useful (essential, even) for joining together the parts of
an information system, cheap and easy to use, but subject (as is any
technology) to abuse.  Yet we don't require registration of ``duct
tape users,'' and we shouldn't require registration of cryptography
users.  (Key recovery is the effective equivalent of registering duct
tape users, or of requiring registration of every usage of duct tape.)

Today, most information is digital, stored in computers and
transmitted over networks.  Diaries, love-letters, medical and
financial records, business plans, movies, political speeches, and
textbooks are all represented and communicated as sequences of ones
and zeros.  A large fraction of our national memory is now captured,
saved, and replayed in digital form.

In its pure form, digital information is anonymous--you can't tell who
created a given one or a given zero.  A digital prescription may have
been created by your physician, or by a high-school hacker.  A digitized
world requires authentication: a way of telling who authored what.  

Similarly, digital information is normally transmitted semi-publicly
on a radio or on a computer network.  Anyone with an appropriate
receiver or network connection can ``listen in'' to what is being
sent.  (With a little more work, an eavesdropper can even modify the
information being transmitted.)  The digital world is largely a public
world, unless special steps are taken to make information private.

The two most important needs of the digital world are thus
authentication and privacy (or confidentiality).  These needs are of
exceptional importance for the security of this nation.  Our economy
requires the authenticity of financial transactions.  The
competitiveness of our industries requires the confidentiality of
their planning, operational, and technological information.  We lose
billions every year through fraudulent financial transactions and
corporate espionage.  Law and order requires achieving authenticity
and confidentiality of our digitized information infrastructure.

Fortunately, there are reliable ways to achieve privacy and
authentication.  The essential tool is cryptography---the science of
communicating securely in the presence of adversaries who wish to
overhear or modify your digital communications.  Cryptography enables
two parties to ensure that an adversary can not understand a
transmitted message (because it is encrypted) and that an adversary
can not modify a transmitted message without being detected (because
it is ``digitally signed'').  Cryptography uses sophisticated
mathematics to provide unbreakable encryption and unforgeable digital
signatures.

Cryptography is a relatively new technology, outside of military
applications.  In the public domain, serious study of cryptography
really began in the 60's, but didn't blossom until the 70's and 80's.
Necessity is the mother of invention, and computer networks are the
mother of modern cryptography.  Computer networks need cryptography to
link their far-flung parts together just as a high-rise building needs
welds and rivets to hold the girders together.  Without cryptography,
computers don't know which other computers they are talking with, and
don't know if their information is securely kept within a given domain
of trusted computers.  Without rivets, a high-rise building is a pile
of girders, none supporting each other, with all of the building
contents spilled on the ground.

In most engineering sciences, the way parts connect and interact is
most important.  With computer networks, either the parts connect and
interact using cryptography, or they are vulnerable to fraud and
unwanted disclosure of information.  

Computers are not connected merely by wires and networks.  Being
attached to one end of a wire or network provides little assurance as
to who is at the other end of the wire, or that the information
received was not modified en route.  The real connection is provided
by cryptography.  Cryptography helps guide and control the flow of
information, such as duct tape helps connect one air duct to another.

Cryptography is the ``connection science'' of computer networks.  

Used well, cryptography enables us to build the information
infrastructure of the twenty-first century: secure and strong enough
to support our information-based national economy.  Used poorly, we
invite hackers and enemies to disrupt our networks and steal from us.
Law and order requires a strong national capability in cryptography,
well-executed, to protect our information infrastructure.

Most technologies are usable by the ``bad guys'' as well as by the
``good guys.''  The automobile becomes a get-away car.  The radio and
telephone enable long-distance communications between a crook and his
boss.  The computer is used to run a numbers game.  Duct tape is used
to tie up hostages.  Airplanes carry drugs.  Most technologies are
egalitarian--they help everyone, good or bad, to be more effective or
more efficient.

Of course, there are numerous examples of forensic and surveillance
technologies developed specifically for law-enforcement: DNA, fiber,
handwriting and fingerprint analysis, bugging and wiretapping,
polygraphs, video surveillance, radar speed detectors, chemical trace
detectors, intrusion and motion detectors, and so on.  Because of
these specific advances, one can reasonably conclude that
technological advances have, overall, helped law enforcement immensely.

It is curious that the technology of cryptography has come to be such
a controversial one in terms of societal policy.  The issue arises
because cryptography allows individuals, good or bad, to keep their
communications confidential.

Of course, the issue isn't really whether individuals can have private
conversations.  Of course they can.  You and I can always meet
privately on the beach or elsewhere to talk.  I believe that a
democratic society should guarantee the right of any two individuals
to have a private conversation, unless one or both of them is in jail.
(This is an important belief to me, although not central to the
development here.)

The problem arises from the fact that more and more of our
communications are now carried on electronically.  When I was young, a
phone call was a rare event, and TV a novelty.  Today, the bulk of my
communications are electronic---I use the phone, TV, and email heavily
for routine communications.  I talk to my wife almost as much on the
phone as I do to her in person (we talk a lot on the phone).  I
frequently send email to my secretary to ask her to do something.  I
watch the news on TV.  Because it conquers distance easily, electronic
communication replaces talking face-to-face.  

But electronic communication, like any network communication,
engenders needs for privacy and authentication.  I want to know that
no one is listening in to my conversaation with my wife.  My secretary
wants to know that the request to mail out my draft paper is really
from me. 

We have been working with a deeply flawed communications network for
most of the century.  The network does not provide the privacy and
authentication that it should.  It replaces private face-to-face
communication with reproduced voice and email that is not guaranteed
to be private and is not guaranteed to be authentic.  Cellular phones
have long been known to broadcast lover's sighs and credit-card
numbers to all who cared to listen.  A computer receiving a phone call
has little idea who is calling, until the caller identifies himself
with a name and password.  The network gets the information from one
point to another, but privacy and authentication have been lost in the
transition from face-to-face to electronics.

Law enforcement has upon occasion exploited these flawed
communications networks.  Wiretapping exploits the lack of privacy.
Bad guys (and good guys) often use the computer and phone networks as
if they had properties of privacy and authentication that they don't.
A wiretap can pick up a inadvertent fact or admission.

We are in the process of fixing these flawed networks, because it is
in our national interest to do so.  Cryptography is the essential tool
that can provide the privacy and authentication required.  The ``fix''
may take the form of new phones embodying cryptography, or of a
computer program that enables secure computer-to-computer connections.
Engineers everywhere are adding cryptography to their network and
product designs.  Devices that process digital information now use
cryptography routinely.  Products that don't use cryptography are
``cracked'' and cause their users and manufacturers huge problems.

Electronic commerce, electronic voting, the privacy of medical
records, pay-per-view entertainment, protection of intellectual
property, maintaining the stability of the financial system, and
controlling access to information and property all require
cryptography.  Cryptography is becoming as ubiquitous and pervasive
as electronic communications, because electronic communications
require cryptography to function properly and securely.

The average household may soon (if not already) contain dozens of
devices that deal with digitized information, all of which use
cryptography.  You will have pay-TV decoder boxes, smart-cards in your
wallet, electricity meters that can be read remotely, computers that
allow you browse the web, purchase items with your credit card, or
read your email, electronic door locks that communicate with an
electronic key, postage meters that print digitized postage stamps,
phones that provide secure communications, and medical records
encrypted in your electronic wallet.  Everywhere there is information,
there cryptography will be.

Good cryptography is the friend of law enforcement, because it
prevents crime.  Cryptography allows the flow of information to be
managed and checked.  Information only goes where it is supposed to
go, and bad or fraudulent information is detected and discarded.
Information theft and fraud based on unauthorized information
manipulation are stopped in their tracks by cryptography.

It is in our national interest to see that cryptography is vigorously
developed and utilized by the private sector.  Our economy is becoming
increasingly based on information and information management, and
cryptography is the most important and effective tool for controlling
and authenticating the flow of information.  Economic and political
adversaries, malcontents and insiders can exploit poorly protected
information systems.  Airline control systems, power grids, financial
institutions, and high-tech industries are either well-protected
cryptographically, or they are vulnerable targets waiting to be
attacked.

Cryptography is a defensive technology.  It protects against an
adversary exploiting a lack of privacy or a lack of authentication.
It is the lightning rod, the flame-proof material, the door-way
peep-hole of communications.  It protects the user from harm.  It is
the ``communications condom'' protecting one from ``unsafe
communications.''  It prevents damage to the integrity or privacy of
an information system.  It does not do damage itself.  

Given the overwhelming need for such a excellent defensive technology
in today's world, why should anyone attempt to restrict or limit its
use?  The answer is obvious: if the ``bad guys'' can use this
defensive technology as well, then the ``good guys'' won't be able to
tap and exploit their communications.

As noted earlier, technology often smiles on the evil as well as on
the good.  Unfortunately, this is as true of cryptography as it is of
the automobile.  The bad guys can protect their secrets with
cryptography, and smuggle their drugs in an automobile.  

When should technology be regulated?  I think there are two conditions
that need to be satisfied:

	(a) it should first of all be possible to do so, and
	
	(b) the benefit of regulation should exceed the costs and
	    disadvantages of doing so.

I feel that cryptography fails on both counts.

It is not possible to effectively regulate cryptography.  Trying to do
so is trying to command the sea to retreat.  As noted above,
information systems require cryptography for effective and secure
operation.  It is not possible to prohibit cryptography without
crippling our information infrastructure.  It is not possible to
require ``weak cryptography'' without leaving the whole structure
vulnerable to collapse.  And it is not possible to provide ``key
recovery'' without running enormous risks, as noted in my recent
report [KR].  Putting key recovery into cryptography is like
soaking your flame-retardant materials in gasoline---you risk a
catastrophic failure of the exact sort you were trying to prevent.
The ability of organized crime to corrupt just a few officials or
judges could be the spark that ignites it, with the security of our
national information infrastructure disappearing in the flames of keys
``recovered'' by organized crime.  

Indeed, key recovery schemes seem like they were designed by organized
crime.  What could be better than to persuade corporate America to
effectively put all of its secrets of its in one or a few baskets,
baskets that are sure to be underfunded and poorly guarded because
they are hardly ever used legitimately?  

Moreover, cryptography is impossible to regulate because it is trivial
to reproduce.  Many cryptographic techniques can be described with a
computer program that is shorter than the preceding paragraph.
Cryptography programs have been ``published'' on T-shirts.  Trying to
prevent the spread of a cryptographic technique is as hard as trying
to prevent the spread of a good piece of juicy gossip.  A short
telephone call can transmit a cryptographic program from one state or
country to another.  While one could coerce some major manufacturers
into producing products that are cryptographically weakened to include
key-recovery, alternative cryptographic techniques are easily
available from overseas world-wide-web sites.  I don't believe that
one should pass laws or issue regulations that are laughably naive
about the likelihood that they are capable of enforcement or being
effective in the desired aims.

Second, I believe that disadvantages of regulating cryptography far
exceed the aimed-for advantages.  It is regrettable that some ``bad
guys'' will use cryptography to conceal their activities.  It is
regrettable that duct tape is used by criminals too.  But I already
have more cryptographic devices in my house than I have rolls of duct
tape, and the benefits of duct tape are accepted without undue regard
for the fact that criminals might find it useful.  I believe that one
should properly regard cryptography as a kind of ``duct tape'' for the
information infrastructure of the country.  Like duct tape,
cryptography is cheap, essential, and easily reproduced.  Everyone
needs it.  Like duct tape, cryptography is used very widely for
legitimate purposes, and very infrequently by criminals.  Some crooks
will use cryptography.  We'll catch them and convict them using the
many newly developed forensic and surveillance technologies.  Trying
to regulate ``duct tape'' or register its users is foolish and a waste
of taxpayer's money.

References

[KR] The Risks of Key Recovery, Key Escrow, and Trusted Third Party 
     Encryption.  By Hal Abelson, Ross Anderson, Steven M. Bellovin,
     Josh Benaloh, Matt Blaze, Whitfield Diffie, John Gilmore, 
     Peter G. Neumann, Ronald L. Rivest, Jeffery I. Schiller, and 
     Bruce Schneier.
     At http://www.crypto.com/key_study/


------------------------

Professor Ronald L. Rivest is the Webster Professor of Electrical
Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, and Associate Director of
MIT's Laboratory for Computer Science, and head of that laboratory's
Cryptography and Information Security research group.  He is a
co-inventor of the RSA public-key cryptosystem, and a founder of RSA
Data Security, a Redwood City (California) firm specializing in
cryptographic software.  He has numerous publications in the area of
cryptography, and has served on the board of directors of the
International Association for Cryptologic Research.  He is a member of
the National Academy of Engineering.


 

 
     

 

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